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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9471

Title: Physical violence during pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes in Ghana
Authors: Agyemang, Charles
Jonge, Ank de
Owusu-Dabo, Ellis
Pool, Michelle Sharon
Keywords: Domestic violence
Intimate partner violence
Early pregnancy loss
Perinatal mortality
eonatal mortality
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Citation: Pool et al. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2014, 14:71
Abstract: Background: In pregnancy, violence can have serious health consequences that could affect both mother and child. In Ghana there are limited data on this subject. We sought to assess the relationship between physical violence during pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes (early pregnancy loss, perinatal mortality and neonatal mortality) in Ghana. Method: The 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey data were used. For the domestic violence module, 2563 women were approached of whom 2442 women completed the module. After excluding missing values and applying the weight factor, 1745 women remained. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between physical violence in pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes with adjustments for potential confounders. Results: About five percent of the women experienced violence during their pregnancy. Physical violence in pregnancy was positively associated with perinatal mortality and neonatal mortality, but not with early pregnancy loss. The differences remained largely unchanged after adjustment for age, parity, education level, wealth status, marital status and place of residence: adjusted odds ratios were 2.32; 95% CI: 1.34-4.01 for perinatal mortality, 1.86; 95% CI: 1.05-3.30 for neonatal mortality and 1.16; 95% CI: 0.60-2.24 for early pregnancy loss. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that violence during pregnancy is related to adverse pregnancy outcomes in Ghana. Major efforts are needed to tackle violence during pregnancy. This can be achieved through measures that are directed towards the right target groups. Measures should include education, empowerment and improving socio-economic status of women.
Description: This Article was published by BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2014, 14:71
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9471
Appears in Collections:College of Health Sciences

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