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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8093

Title: Men at work
Authors: Asante, Albert Oduro
Issue Date: 9-Nov-2015
Abstract: In this thesis /exhibition project, I argue that the creation of the spider web sacramentally serve as a symbolism for connectivity and not necessarily a fabric of bad luck or entrapment. Through studio work, installation and experiment, I investigate metaphorical questions on how the mass is used in search for power. I am engaging metaphorically the often misleading emphasis upon the radical alterity of these spaces in reference to politically what the spider does the web for - where the mass is used in search for authority but does not benefit from the power attained. The initial stimulus for deliberations raises questions about the establishment of order in our culture, or those basic codes that govern perceptions, language and practice. The inventive play produces a different space that at the same time mirrors the issues around us. The space reflects and contests simultaneously. With war, a frightening prospect and fruitful negotiations a still-distant dream, power have become the West’s instrument of choice. They are everywhere in the financial arena, barring habitual commercial relations; in the oil sector, choking off Tehran’s principal source of currency; in the insurance sector, thwarting its ability to transport goods. Add to this myriad unintended consequences (bolstering the regime’s ability to allocate goods; harming ordinary citizens; pushing leaders persuaded the goal is regime change to escalate its own retaliatory steps; and constructing a web of punitive measures harder to unknot than to weave).Confusion on this score has undermined efforts to right the imbalance. My purpose here is to clarify the analytic roles that power and cooperation actually play in this literature, and to argue that a more balanced theory one that brings power from its periphery to its very core is both necessary and entirely possible.
Description: A thesis submitted to the Board of Graduate Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the Degree of Master of Fine Art in Sculpture, 2015
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8093
Appears in Collections:College of Arts and Social Sciences

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