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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7937

Title: Congenital Transmission of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum co-infections in pregnant women and their new born babies in the Kumasi Metropolis
Authors: Arthur - Mensah, Reginald
Issue Date: 1-Nov-2015
Abstract: Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. About 90% of the world’s population is reported to be infected with the parasite. The disease is important for its serious implications in immunocompromised individuals including pregnant women and its severe consequences on fetuses in congenital transmission. Malaria caused by one of its most virulent species, P. falciparum continues to be a major health challenge in sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated T. gondii and P. falciparum infections in pregnant women and their babies in the Kumasi metropolis. A total of 183 pregnant women and 186 babies were tested. Risk factors associated with toxoplasmosis and malaria infection were assessed by a questionnaire guide. Maternal and fetal blood was safely drawn from the appropriate blood vessels of the placenta after delivery. Blood blots were made on filter papers and whole blood was spun to obtain sera. Serum samples were tested for anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM using commercial ELISA kits and DNA was extracted from blotted blood samples for detection of T. gondii and P. falciparum infections by a nested PCR. An overall seroprevalence of 44.8% (82/183) anti-T. gondii IgG was recorded. Parasite prevalence as determined by PCR was 23% (42/183) for T. gondii only and 3.8% (7/183) for P. falciparum only. About 2% (4/183) pregnant women were co-infected with both parasites. This is the first report of Toxoplasma infection in the Kumasi metropolis. Results reveal an appreciable prevalence in pregnant women thus calling for the need to create awareness and intensify public education in women of child bearing age and implement measures for screening of Toxoplasma infection during antenatal care.
Description: Congenital Transmission of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum co-infections in pregnant women and their new born babies in the Kumasi Metropolis A Thesis submitted to the Department of Theoretical and Applied Biology, College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy (Parasitology), 2014
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7937
Appears in Collections:College of Science

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