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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2099

Title: Waste fabrics that can be used to produce handmade papers when combined with the paper mulberry bark
Authors: Yeboah, Rita
Issue Date: 29-Nov-2011
Abstract: The problem studied focuses on how some of the things society perceives as waste can be best managed to prevent the problems that waste causes to the environment. The study focused mainly on identifying waste fabrics that could produce useful sheets of papers when combined with paper mulberry. In this context, waste fabrics included pieces of linen, cotton, wool, nylon, polyester and acetate fabrics from cutting floors of garment makers and old cloths that are no more of use to their owners. Paper mulberry is a plant grown purposely for papermaking because of the cellulose content in its inner bark which makes it suitable for making paper. The waste fabrics were combined with paper mulberry inner back in the ratio of 30% paper mulberry and 70% waste fabrics to produce handmade papers. Colour pencils, watercolour, pastel, poster colour, oil and acrylic paints were tested on the papers produced from the identified fabrics. In addition, miniature books were made from the sheets to ascertain their suitability for book making as well as their adaptability to usage as writing pads. The linen, cotton, nylon, polyester, wool and acetate waste fabrics. The study introduced the outcome of the experimental work to selected art teachers in the Kumasi metropolis so that they could also introduce this art to their students in school. Three research questions that guided the study were: How can experiments be carried out to identify waste fabrics that can produce useful papers when combined with the bark of the paper mulberry plant? How can the identified fabrics be used to produce sheets of paper to be used in making art? How can the workshop with the teachers be carried out? Findings from this qualitative research approaches used were experimental, descriptive and action research methods with participant observation and interviews. The population studied consisted of Primary, Junior and Senior High School art teachers in Kumasi. The convenience sampling technique was used to select 20 schools and purposive sampling was used to select one art teacher each from the 20 schools. From the experiments conducted, it was discovered that cotton waste plus paper mulberry, the combination of linen, cotton plus paper mulberry can produce useful sheets that can be used as writing pads. Nylon, polyester, wool, and acetate sheets could not be used as writing pads. Cotton waste plus paper mulberry, the combination of linen, cotton, plus paper mulberry sheets can be used for colour pencil and pastel works conveniently without problems. Sheets from nylon, polyester, wool and acetate waste fabrics cannot be used for colour pencil and pastel works. Cotton plus paper mulberry sheets can conveniently support watercolour works, but because of the fast absorption, drying and bleeding nature of the watercolour paint on the linen, nylon, polyester, wool, acetate and the combination of linen, cotton and paper mulberry sheets, working with the watercolour paint on the sheets is not very convenient. Linen, cotton, nylon, polyester, wool, acetate and the combination of linen, cotton and paper mulberry handmade sheets can all give a good support to oil and acrylic paints. Linen, cotton, nylon, polyester, wool, acetate, and the combination of linen, cotton and paper mulberry sheets can support poster painting excellently. From the workshop organised for the selected teachers, it was deduced that for waste recycling to become part and parcel of individual Ghanaians, it will take education and this education can start from schools. From the study, it was proposed that the government should establish a paper and pulp mill in Kumasi for papermaking. Ghana Education Service (GES) should organise annual workshops for Creative Art teachers in Primary and Junior High schools to teach the teachers the hand papermaking processes. Schools in Ghana must set up practical recycling programmes and activities in their schools, to help instill the need and importance of recycling of waste materials in students. To sustain recycling programmes and activities in schools, heads of schools must be willing to provide basic equipment and tools that students will need to work with. Further research must be carried out to identify recyclable waste materials that can be adopted for recycling.
Description: A Report on thesis submitted to the School of Graduate Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Art Education, 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2099
Appears in Collections:College of Arts and Social Sciences

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