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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1355

Title: Abdominal wound infection complicating caesarean section
Authors: Danso, K. A.
Adu-Sarkodie, Y.
Keywords: Caesarean section
Abdominal wound infection
Issue Date: 1998
Publisher: Ghana Medical Journal
Citation: Ghana Medical Journal, vol. 32b
Abstract: A prospective descriptive study of all the caesarean sections performed at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, between May 1, and July 31, 1996 was done to determine the incidence, bacterial aeti- ology and severity of abdominal wound infection complicating the operation. There were 2,314 total deliveries out of which 350 were caesarean sections. Wound infection occurred among 53/350 or 15.14% of the cases. Staphylococ- cus aureus, Escherichia coli and other coliforms were together associated with 90.6% of the infec- tions. There were no anaerobic bacterial isolates. The majority of the wound infections, 31/53 or 58%, were of moderate degree. Cases which were referred from elsewhere in labour prior to the caesarean section, or in whom antibiotics were not started pre-operatively or intra-operatively were associated with a statistically significant higher rates of wound infection. It is concluded that infection of the abdominal wound is an important morbidity complicating caesarean section. There is therefore the need to minimize this complication through strict infection pre- A prospective descriptive study of all the caesarean sections performed at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, between May 1, and July 31, 1996 was done to determine the incidence, bacterial aeti- ology and severity of abdominal wound infection complicating the operation. There were 2,314 total deliveries out of which 350 were caesarean sections. Wound infection occurred among 53/350 or 15.14% of the cases. Staphylococ- cus aureus, Escherichia coli and other coliforms were together associated with 90.6% of the infec- tions. There were no anaerobic bacterial isolates. The majority of the wound infections, 31/53 or 58%, were of moderate degree. Cases which were referred from elsewhere in labour prior to the caesarean section, or in whom antibiotics were not started pre-operatively or intra-operatively were associated with a statistically significant higher rates of wound infection. It is concluded that infection of the abdominal wound is an important morbidity complicating caesarean section. There is therefore the need to minimize this complication through strict prevention practices.
Description: An article published by Ghana Medical Journal, vol.32b, 1998
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1355
Appears in Collections:College of Health Sciences

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