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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/13387

Title: Current trends in admissions and outcomes of cardiac diseases in Ghana
Authors: Appiah, Lambert Tetteh
Sarfo, Fred Stephen
Agyemang, Charles
Tweneboah, Humphrey O.
Appiah, Nana Akua B.A.
Bedu-Addo, George
Opare-Sem, Ohene
Keywords: Cardiac Disease
CVDs
Ghana
Heart failure
Hypertension
IHD
SSA
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Clinical Cardiology
Citation: Clinical Cardiology, 2017;40:783–788;DOI: 10.1002/clc.22753
Abstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) pose a major burden in Africa, but data on temporal trends in disease burden are lacking. We assessed trends in CVD admissions and outcomes in central Ghana using a retrospective analysis of data from January 2004 to December 2015 among patients admitted to the medical wards of a tertiary medical center in Kumasi, Ghana. Rates of admissions and mortality were expressed as CVD admissions and deaths divided by the total number of medical admissions and deaths, respectively. Case fatality rates per specific cardiac disease diagnosis were also computed. Over the period, there were 4226 CVD admissions, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.1 to 1. There was a progressive increase in percentage of CVD admissions from 4.6% to 8.2%, representing an 78% increase, between 2004 and 2014. Of the 2170 CVD cases whose data were available, the top 3 causes of CVD admissions were heart failure (HF; 88.3%), ischemic heart disease (IHD; 7.2%), and dysrhythmias (1.9%). Of all HF admissions, 52% were associated with hypertension. IHD prevalence rose by 250% between 2005 and 2015. There were 976 deaths (23%), with an increase in percentage of hospital deaths that were cardiovascular in nature from 3.6% to 7.3% between 2004 and 2014, representing a 102% increase. Cardiac disease admissions and mortality have increased progressively over the past decade, with HF as the most common cause of admission. Once rare, IHD is emerging as a significant contributor to the CVD burden in sub-Saharan Africa.
Description: An article published in Clinical Cardiology, 2017;40:783–788;DOI: 10.1002/clc.22753
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/13387
Appears in Collections:College of Health Sciences

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