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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11319

Title: Bamboo-reinforced self-compacting concrete beams for sustainable construction in rural areas
Authors: Adom-Asamoah, Mark
Osei Banahene, Jack
Obeng, Jacqueline
Antwi Boasiako, Eugene
Keywords: bamboo
ductility
flexure
RC beams
self-compacting concrete
Issue Date: 9-May-2017
Publisher: Wiley fib
Citation: Department of Civil Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana Correspondence Adom-Asamoah, Department of Civil Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. Email: madom-asamoah.coe@knust.edu.gh
Abstract: The use of bamboo as longitudinal reinforcement, coupled with the application of self-compacted concrete (SCC) in the construction industry, may be a promising solution to issues involving sustainable development in developing countries. This study seeks to investigate the flexural performance of bamboo-reinforced SCC beams with adequate transverse reinforcement. The major design parameters were the shear span-to-depth ratio, the percentage of longitudinal reinforcement, and the maximum size of coarse aggregate. The load–deflection curves, serviceability and ultimate failure characteristics, cracking behavior, and ductility measures were evaluated and discussed among tested beams. Results indicated that their structural performance at service and ultimate failure would be adequate when a material reduction factor of three is used with BS 8110 design code. However, to achieve maximum ductility, the level of longitudinal reinforcement should be in range of 2.6–3.1%. Furthermore, an increase in the size of coarse aggregate will greatly impact the degree of ductility.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11319
Appears in Collections:College of Engineering

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